FLUXNET Secondment Program 2022 potential hosts

Potential hosts for 2022 Secondments will be posted here.  Applicants are expected to contact host institutions prior to submitting an application. 2022 Secondment Recipient application now open! Deadline to apply has been extended to March 18th.

 

Note that you are not restricted to the hosts on this list! You may propose to work with someone else, provided they agree to host you.

___________________________________________________________________
Potential secondment host/institution:

Oliver Sonnentag ([email protected])
Université de Montréal, Département de géographie
Montréal, QC, Canada

Project description:
Over the last nine years, my lab has established a transect of five micrometeorological towers along a 2000-km latitudinal permafrost gradient across the Arctic-boreal region of northwestern Canada. The transect ranges from central Saskatchewan (boreal forest with no permafrost), across the Taiga Plains ecozone of the Northwest Territories (forested boreal peat landscapes with sporadic, discontinuous permafrost), to the forest-tundra ecotone with continuous permafrost near the Arctic Ocean. The main focus along the transect is on net carbon, water and heat exchanges measured continuously at ecosystem-scale with the eddy covariance technique. The goal is to understand changing land surface-atmosphere interactions under the influence of rapidly changing permafrost conditions in response to climate warming and anthropogenic pressures (e.g., the adverse consequences of Canada’s natural resource economy). Various data analysis and synthesis projects could be developed with secondment recipients. For example, comparing 2017 water and carbon fluxes from ten eddy covariance towers in the Northwest Territories in support of the 2017 Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment Airborne Campaign (see Miller et al., Environ. Res. Lett. 14 (2019) 080201).

Potential project timeline:
Between March and June or between September and December 2022.

___________________________________________________________________
Potential secondment host/institution:
Manuel Helbig ([email protected])
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Project description:
My research focuses on the role of land-atmosphere interactions for regional to global climate change. I am particularly interested in interactions between heatwave and drought development and land-atmosphere exchange processes in eastern Canada. In my research, I make use of direct measurements of energy and greenhouse gas fluxes between land and atmosphere (with the eddy covariance technique), of ground-based remote sensing of atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, of satellite-based remote sensing observations of land surface and lower atmospheric conditions, and of modelling approaches to assess the broader implications of our observations. Ongoing research projects address climate and carbon cycle impacts of hydroelectric power generation and heatwave and drought development in densely forested regions of eastern Canada. To better understand feedbacks across the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, I am setting up a long-term land-atmosphere observatory integrating observations from the subsurface to the free troposphere in New Brunswick, Canada. Secondment recipients will be contributing to research at the new observatory and can focus on either observational or modelling studies of land-atmosphere interactions.

Potential project timeline:
The secondment can occur between June and August. Duration can range between 2 to 6 weeks depending on research focus.

 

___________________________________________________________________
Potential secondment host/institution:
Bryce Van Dam ([email protected])
Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon
Germany

Project description:
We are presently operating one EC station in a tidal inlet to the Wadden Sea, and will be constructing another system in the western Baltic Sea, adjacent to a wind power farm, in the near future. In general, we are interested in the biogeochemical processes driving air-water CO2 fluxes, while at the same time considering also the physical processes driving lateral carbon exchanges. Secondment participants wishing to expand their research to the coastal marine domain could benefit from this collaboration, and we could benefit from an incorporation of our field sites into the FLUXNET community.

Potential project timeline:
Summer, any duration between 2-6 weeks would be productive.

___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Stefan Arndt ([email protected])
The University of Melbourne
Melbourne or Creswick, Australia

Project description:
The long-term research EC research sites at Wombat and Whroo facilitate the investigation of complex ecosystem processes of the carbon, water and nutrient cycle in dry-sclerophyll forest ecosystems that are typical for many forests in Australia. This research will help to assess the impact of future environmental change on broadleaf evergreen forest ecosystems that are unique in Australia. Both sites represent large ecosystems in south-eastern Australia with one located in a slightly wetter climate (Wombat, 800 mm MAP, 12 C MAT) and one located in a drier climate (Whroo, 500 mm MAP, 15 C MAT). We have excellent long-term tree growth data for one location (Wombat) and extensive ecophysiological data on many of the eucalypt species on both sites.
Our research will:
-Quantify the carbon sink/source strength of a dry sclerophyll forest and identify the contribution of such forests to Australia’s National Carbon Inventory.
-Quantify the emission and/or uptake of non-CO2 greenhouse gases, such as nitrous oxide and methane of the forest.
-Assess the role of climate variability and drought on ecosystem processes.
-Assess the impact of disturbances (such as fire) on ecosystem processes.
-Provide a database of microclimate and ecological parameters for use in carbon and water modelling projects.

Potential project timeline:
In principle the secondment can occur any time. Length of the secondment is also flexible, depending on the nature of the secondment.
___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Sally Thompson ([email protected])
University of Western Australia
Perth, Australia

Project description:
Our research group has broad ecological, hydrological, agricultural and remote sensing related interests. The Western Australian study sites offer an opportunity to explore the “lagging edge” of climate change in a Mediterranean Climate, places where increasing temperature and decreasing rainfall are likely to impose significant stresses on ecosystems, agriculture and ecosystem services; and where thoughtful adaptation strategies are required. Example projects could include exploring how ecosystem water use and disturbance impact groundwater recharge, identification of agricultural and ecological stress thresholds, scaling between tower and landscape observations, and fundamental process investigation (e.g. around interception evaporation, flux partitioning).

Potential project timeline:
The secondment could productively occur in the second half of 2022. The scholar may need to adjust timing around any COVID-19 related travel restrictions or concerns. Given the demands of international travel to Australia, we recommend a longer stay (6 weeks) rather than shorter.

___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Andrew S. Kowalski ([email protected])
University of Granada
Granada, Spain

Project description:
The proposed theme is the partitioning of surface-normal (vertical), boundary-layer transport into turbulent diffusion and non-diffusive transport that is achieved by the mean flow as a consequence of the momentum of air that is dominated by that of water vapor due to evaporation. Derivation of the mean flow is following Kowalski (2017, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8177-8187). Partitioning of physical transport mechanisms according to Kowalski et al. (2021, Bound-Layer Meteorol., 179 (3), 347-367). Particular interests include (1) the relevance of this partitioning to frequency corrections for spectral attenuation; and (2) partitioning fluxes of CH4 and N2O, whose non-diffusive transport is far from negligible.

Potential project timeline:
The secondment should last at least four weeks and occur in late spring (May-June).
___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Sara Knox ([email protected])
The University of British Columbia
Vancouver, Canada

Project description:
With growing interest in wetland management and restoration as a natural climate solution, improved estimates of wetland carbon sequestration and greenhouse (GHG) fluxes across wetland types are strongly needed. Our research aims to contribute to an improved understanding of the response of wetland carbon dynamics to management and climate change in key wetland types across Canada. We operate eddy covariance towers in a range of wetland types, including restored peatlands and tidal wetlands near Vancouver, Canada, and wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of western Canada since these ecosystems play important roles in carbon cycling and climate regulation.

Potential project timeline:
Between May and August, and the duration can range between 2 to 6 weeks depending on the research focus.
___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Debora Regina Roberti ([email protected])
Universidade Federal de Santa Maria
Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil

Project description:
Our group has over 20 years of tradition in micrometeorological and eddy covariance measurements. Currently, our research is focused on understanding the surface-atmosphere interactions in the fields of the Pampa Biome in southern Brazil, used for centuries for cattle ranching, where we have two flux tower sites (Santa Maria – on an experimental field of our university, measuring continuously since 2015; and Aceguá – on a commercial farm 60 km far from the Brazil-Uruguay border, measuring continuously since 2018). Although this ecosystem has never been land-use converted, it is anthropized in the sense that cattle are managed according to the availability of forage, which varies greatly between winter and summer. The southern region of Brazil is characterized by winters with several frost events and summers with temperatures that can reach 40°C. Climatically, the precipitation is well distributed over the year, but events such as El Nino and La Nina affect the precipitation in this region (El Nino increases rainfall and La Nina decreases rainfall). An example is occurring in the 2022 summer where La Nina is resulting in intense droughts. Therefore, we are interested in understanding how these phenomena affect the ecosystem processes. In addition, we want to understand how these ecosystems behave concerning emissions and absorption of greenhouse gases and how to model them including remote sensing.

Potential project timeline:
The secondment could occur any time, at least four weeks.

___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Dan Yakir ([email protected])
Weizmann Institute of Science
Rehovot, Israel

Project description:
Eco-physiology of forests ecosystems in the dry timberline, using novel methodologies (including SIF, COS, Thermal radiation) to unravel the processes underlying resistance, adaptation, or mortality under changing climate

Potential project timeline:
Any time if properly coordinated and housing can be arranged.
___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Pierre Polsenaere ([email protected])
IFREMER
Station de La Tremblade, Laboratoire Environnement et Ressources des Pertuis Charentais, French research institute for exploitation of the sea, Resources and Environment Laboratory, Avenue de Mus de Loup, Ronce-les-Bains, 17390, La Tremblade, France.

Project description:
My research at Ifremer focuses on atmospheric CO2 fluxes measured by Eddy Covariance over tidal flats and marshes to better understand and quantify CO2 exchanges at the ecosystem scale and at the different time scales (diurnal, tidal, seasonal) and associated CO2 sink potentials from these coastal systems. EC measurements are carried out in the Charentais Sounds area (French Atlantic coast) over a tidal flat in 2020-2021 (HypEddy CNES/TOSCA project 2020-2021) and are still running nearby over a tidal marsh since 2019 (ANR PAMPAS project 2019-2023). Other deployments are planned over other terrestrial-aquatic continuums (i.e. Marais poitevin, Aiguillon Bay, LRTZC project). The idea for the participant is to work on these EC measurements (and those will come) from in situ measurements, data processing to post-analysis (i.e. environmental factors) to compare, quantify and qualify the role of these coastal ecosystems in regional and global carbon budgets.

Potential project timeline:
6 weeks, it could occur from October 2022 or later.
___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Dr. Enrico A. Yepez ([email protected])
INSTITUTO TECNOLOGICO DE SONORA
Ciudad Obregon, Sonora Mexico

Project description:
Our observatory is focused in understanding the effects of the strong seasonality that drives main ecosystem processes at the northern most limit of the tropical dry forest (TDF) biome, the site is located at the Sierra de Alamos Rio Cuchujaqui Natural protected Area in north western Mexico (https://simec.conanp.gob.mx/ficha.php?anp=22&reg=2). Our long-term monitoring scheme included soil, vegetation and overall ecosystem processes and central to the study is to compare the function of an old-growth TDF and a TDF that was once cleared and now has ~45 years of secondary recovery.
Due to the Covid pandemic our monitoring activities halted. So, we are now resuming activities and want to bring new perspectives and tools to study ecosystem processes across different scales. We are particularly interested in establishing the use of contemporary remote sensing tool such as SIF and products that monitor soil moisture variability at fine scales.

Potential project timeline:
The ideal time to visit or TDF in Sonora, is during the fall (sep-oct ideally) when temperatures are milder but the TDFs maintains it splendor. A whole month stay would permit participating in 2 or 3 field campaigns to the sites to engage in the routine maintenance, measurements and discussion ideas of collaboration.
___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Elke Eichelmann ([email protected])
University College Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

Project description:
One of our research interests is investigating water flux partitioning, specifically the application of several new ET partitioning methods across a range of sites (e.g. Eichelmann et al., 2022; Glob. Chang. Biol., 28, 990– 1007. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15974). The secondment participant will have the opportunity to work with water flux data from our Dooary Forest EC site, but also with data from other ecosystems. We are looking to explore how different water flux partitioning methods perform in different ecosystems.

Potential project timeline:
The duration is flexible between 3 to 6 weeks. The secondment can take place anytime between April to early June or August to early October.

___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Jamie Cleverly ([email protected])
James Cook University
Cairns, Queensland, Australia

Project description:
We operate flux towers across the tropics of Australia, from rainforest to semi-arid savanna, grassland and dry woodland. In addition to current data, you will have the opportunity to explore historical fluxes from 10 or 20 years into the past. Possible topics for this secondment include carbon and water budgets of diverse tropical landscapes, applications of flux-variance similarity partitioning to evaluate photodegradation and partition water fluxes, analysis of fluxes in complex terrain and affected by coastal influences, and critical zone science focused on soil and groundwater hydrology. Analytical tools used in our labs include statistical time-series analysis and remote sensing, but we also have some experience with models (pasture/grazing, SVAT and Earth system models) and can provide facilities for you to expand on any modelling you can bring to this secondment.

Potential project timeline:
Access to field sites is highly recommended, which means that this secondment should be closer to 6 weeks long, and it should occur during the dry season for reliable access to remote field sites (austral winter, April–September). Shorter secondments might be accepted for historical data-based secondments which require little field time (although I reckon it would be a shame to come all this way and not visit some sites).
___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Markus Reichstein ([email protected])
Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry
Jena, Germany

Project description:
The department Biogeochemical Integration at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry has a long history of studying ecosystem fluxes from different perspectives, ranging from machine learning to process-based modeling, as well as in synthesizing direct field and remote sensing observations. The highly collaborative department presents the opportunity to interact with many different scientists and research groups across the department, and would welcome researchers to work across number of topics, including:

– Ecosystem-level responses of carbon and water fluxes in open woodlands to different nutrient loading (primarily N and P) and water availability.
– Impacts of drought and heatwave on semi-arid ecosystems’ carbon and water fluxes.
– Carbon dynamics of coastal marsh ecosystem in northwest Germany.
– Evaluation of global carbon and water fluxes estimated from eddy covariance data.
– Analysis of ecosystem transpiration estimates and comparison to other in-situ measurements including sap flux.
– Inverse parameterization, model selection, and hypothesis testing on ecosystem carbon-water modeling approaches.
– Use of EC data to impose observational constraints in multi-model ensemble simulation output (land surface and Earth system models) to reduce uncertainty.
– Land-atmosphere interactions through the integration of satellite and ground measurements.

Potential project timeline:
Any time period can likely be accommodated.
___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Prof. Huidong Li ([email protected])
Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Shenyang, China

Project description:
Changbai Mountain station (42°24′ N, 128°28’E, 736 m) is located in the Northeastern China and is the first EC flux station in China since 2001. It is a key research station of Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN) and has played an important role in International Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) since 1993. It has four EC systems in different temperate forest ecosystems, including primeval forest and secondary forest. The station also occupies isotope profile system, the instruments for CH4 and VOC measurement, climatic chamber, and open top chamber. Our study mainly focuses on carbon and water cycle and vegetation dynamic (phenology) under climate change. We are also working on the development of a multiple-layer canopy model. There are 3 major fields of researches: (1) Carbon cycle process, including carbon cycle of forest ecosystems, influences of enrichment of CO2 on water transferring of root-soil interface of typical tree species; (2) Water cycle process, including modeling of evapotranspiration, mechanism of forest hydrology process and regulation of water resource in watershed. (3) Management and sustained development of forest ecosystems, including forest resource management in northeast of China, healthiness and benefit assessments of forest ecosystem, dynamics and sustained management of typical forest ecosystem.

Potential project timeline:
Growing season: May to September.

___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Olivier Roupsard ([email protected])
LMI IESOL, Intensification Ecologique des Sols Cultivés en Afrique de l’Ouest
Dakar, SENEGAL

Project description:
Please see all our thematic approaches listed here (thematic pdfs to download)
Web site Faidherbia-flux: https://lped.info/wikiObsSN/?Faidherbia-Flux
More specifically, now regarding EC only
*Standardizing EC measurement post-processing to comply with FLUXNET, ICOS requirements
*Comparing EC fluxes above and below tree canopy
*Comparing EC fluxes with soil measurement GHG fluxes
*Model soil heat balance with Hydrus 1D and check energy balance closure
…open to other suggestions

Potential project timeline:
6 weeks is considered a minimum, considering the time of adaptation to a new country like Senegal. Could occur anytime in 2022

___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Minseok Kang ([email protected])
National Center for AgroMeteorology
Seoul, South Korea

Project description:
National Center for AgroMeteorology (NCAM), located in Seoul National University, Gwanak campus, Seoul, South Korea, have been conducting the long-term observations of carbon and energy fluxes for various land cover (e.g., rice paddies, croplands, orchards, broadleaf forests, coniferous forests, mixed forests, and landfills) in South Korea. . NCAM have partnered with various institutions (e.g., National Institute of Agricultural Sciences, National Institute of Forest Science, Seoul National University, and Sudokwon Landfill Site Management Corporation) and been (co-) operating the eddy covariance flux tower networks in South Korea. Currently undergoing research topics are:
(1) Evaluation of forest carbon uptake in South Korea using the national flux tower network, remote sensing, and data-driven technology
(2) Evaluation of long term variability of energy-water-CO2 fluxes for agicultural ecosystems under climate change
(3) Evaluation of reducing evapotranspiration and methane emission for a rice paddy under an agrivoltaic system
(4) Quantification of landfill gas fluxes at a metropolitan landfill

Potential project timeline:
Probably July to October (after the end of the COVID pandemic in South Korea), 2 to 4 weeks (can be extended to 6 weeks)

___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Youngryel Ryu ([email protected])
Seoul National University
Seoul, South Korea

Project description:
We are interested in linking tower based fluxes with in-situ, automated hyperspectral sensors. This task requires linking flux footprint, spectral sensor footprint, and drone based high spatial/spectral resolution data and LiDAR. We welcome contributions in any theme.

Potential project timeline:
Summer (more than 4 weeks) is preferred.

___________________________________________________________________

Potential secondment host/institution:
Timo Vesala ([email protected])
University of Helsinki
Helsinki, Finland

Project description:
We have carried out long-term eddy covariance measurements in Southern Finland since late 90’s (pine forest in Hyytiälä, fen wetland in Siikaneva). Beside carbon dioxide we have measured the flux of carbonyl sulphide (COS). COS is important component as such because its role in the atmospheric chemistry and sulphur deposition and the usage of proxy for GPP and tracer for stomatal conductance estimates. We are looking for a secondment related to COS and carbon cycle studies.

Potential project timeline:
Any time up to 6 weeks.